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Pain Relief for Joints

Pain Relief for Joints

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Pain Relief for Joints

Pain Relief for Joints

Joint pain is often associated with ageing and around one-third of adults experience some degree of pain in their joints every month. And while knee, shoulder, and hip pain are the most common sources of complaints, this kind of pain can affect any joint in the body and is usually spurred on by inflammation.

 

What causes joint pain?

There are several common causes of joint pain, including osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis. Osteoarthritis is the most common type of arthritis and it’s usually caused by wear and tear due to repeated mechanical stress on specific joints. Previous joint injuries can be a primary cause of osteoarthritis, particularly in the knees. People working in manual labour jobs, or jobs requiring a repetitive physical action, like climbing stairs or ladders, are often at an increased risk of developing osteoarthritis. On the other hand, rheumatoid arthritis is an autoimmune disease in which the immune system attacks body tissue. This, in turn, inflames the joint lining, causing a painful swelling that can later cause the erosion of bones and deformation of joints.

There are more sources of joint pain beyond osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis, including bursitis, gout, strains, sprains, and injuries. Bursitis is the inflammation of the bursa, which is a fluid-filled sac that provides cushioning around joints. Most of the major joints in the body have a bursa. Gout is a type of inflammatory arthritis caused by elevated levels of uric acid, and most commonly inflames the big toe joint. A good percentage of gout cases is associated with diet, particularly with the consumption of alcohol, meat, and seafood. However, the susceptibility to developing gout is also partly genetic.1

 

How to prevent joint injuries and pain?

The simplest prevention for joint pain is regular, low-impact exercise. Some studies have shown that a good exercise routine works as effectively as anti-inflammatory pain relievers to reduce knee pain. Low-impact exercises such as walking, swimming, and yoga are ideal. In addition, always using proper technique and body mechanics when playing sports involving repetitive motion can help to strengthen muscles to better support joints.2

 

How to treat joint pain and inflammation?

If your joint pain is accompanied by swelling and redness, and if it feels warm and tender, you should consult your doctor right away. Often, when the pain and swelling aren’t as severe, joint pain can be treated with over-the-counter pain medications. In fact, both Cipladon 500mg and Cipladon 1000mg tablets are effective for relieving strong pain in your joints and are available without a prescription. Additionally, as effervescent paracetamols, Cipladon provides pain relief for joints significantly faster than ordinary paracetamol tablets.

On the other hand, to address severe pain and inflammation, your doctor may prescribe medicines such as non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) to assist with the swelling. Your doctor would also be able to refer you to a specialist for other treatments in the case of severe joint injury. For example, in cases where people don’t find lasting relief from oral medication or topical treatments, several injection therapies may be required. Steroid injections are commonly used to treat arthritis and tendinitis and are injected into the joint every three to four months.3

 

What other joint pain treatments are available?

Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) therapy is a therapy that utilises injections made from your blood. This treatment is often used to treat sports injuries and to promote healing after major surgery. Prolotherapy is an injection treatment where an irritant is injected into joints, ligaments, and tendons, which then stimulates the healing of the injured tissues.

Two other injection treatments are worth mentioning. In conjunction with steroid injections, fluid is sometimes removed from the inflamed joint to remove the pressure. Finally, hyaluronan, a synthetic joint fluid, is sometimes injected into inflamed joints to treat osteoarthritis.4

As always, prevention is better than cure, but in severe cases, surgery may be required to restore function and relieve chronic pain in the joints. This would also normally be followed up by a period of robust physical therapy for ongoing rehabilitation.
 
Sources:


  1. Watson, S. & Smith, M. Joint Pain. WebMD (2021). [online] Available at: <https://www.webmd.com/pain-management/guide/joint-pain> (15/06/2021).
  2. Stanford Children’s Health. Stanfordchildrens.org (2022). [online] Available at: <https://www.stanfordchildrens.org/en/topic/default?id=avoiding-joint-injuries-1-2842>
  3. Watson, S. & Smith, M. Joint Pain. WebMD (2021). [online] Available at: <https://www.webmd.com/pain-management/guide/joint-pain> (15/06/2021).
  4. Watson, S. & Smith, M. Joint Pain. WebMD (2021). [online] Available at: <https://www.webmd.com/pain-management/guide/joint-pain> (15/06/2021).

Please note the content on this website is not intended to be a substitute to a medical professional consultation.